Pride and Prejudice

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Pride and Prejudice

#1  Postby Aurlito » Apr 03, 2010 4:26 pm

Is this book any good? I've read 30 pages and it was all about a stupid ballet and a rich man that danced twice with a girl. will there be any improvements in the story at all?
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#2  Postby Gallstones » Apr 03, 2010 5:05 pm

Pride and Prejudice is my most favorite work of fiction and one of the very few, possibly only, books I will read more than once.

It may not be quite your cup of tea.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#3  Postby Aurlito » Apr 03, 2010 5:47 pm

Good. these comments make me suck it up.

It may not be quite your cup of tea.

Yeah. I love books from Romantists like Dumas, Pere and Hugo. I've read Les Miserable a million times. and The Three Musketeers made my days joyful.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#4  Postby Animavore » Apr 03, 2010 5:48 pm

It's better with zombies.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#5  Postby Aurlito » Apr 03, 2010 5:51 pm

Animavore wrote:It's better with zombies.

Don't mock me please. as I said I'm a fan of Romantism. not post-modernism, as you assume.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#6  Postby Animavore » Apr 03, 2010 6:00 pm

I didn't assume anything. I was just saying it's better with zombies. You can make what you will of that.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#7  Postby Gallstones » Apr 03, 2010 6:45 pm

The tension between the two main characters, Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth kept me reading to see what, if anything, would happen. It was hotter than Penthouse Forum. :shifty:
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#8  Postby Shrunk » Apr 03, 2010 6:51 pm

In case anyone doesn't know what Animavore is talking about:

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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#9  Postby millstone » Apr 03, 2010 7:12 pm

Well, it's been in print long enough for people to make their minds up! There aren't that many books originally written 200 years ago that you can buy brand new off the shelf, after all. Once you get the hang of the bizarre social rules the characters are operating within, it's really good. I haven't tried the zombie version yet - but the sheer number of spin-offs, sequels and films speak for themselves, I think. A bad book, or a worthy but unpopular one, would have long since sunk without trace.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#10  Postby Aca » Apr 03, 2010 9:02 pm

i have a problem with English classics.

Not that they are bad books, but how much social drama can you take in before they all start to feel like rehashing of the same theme? :?

I know what i think does not do justice to some really good work, it's just how i feel about it...
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#11  Postby GreatApe » Apr 04, 2010 1:49 am

I have to apologize to Gallstones and other Austen fans for the following, but when I was working on my Master's degree in English I had to read too much Austen for my taste (a little bit goes a long way). I came to agree with Mark Twain's opinion of Austen's fiction. Among other things he said:
Jane Austen? Why I go so far as to say that any library is a good library that does not contain a volume by Jane Austen. Even if it contains no other book. -- quoted in "Remembered Yesterdays", Robert Underwood Johnson

AND MY ABSOLUTE FAVORITES!
To me his prose is unreadable -- like Jane Austin's [sic]. No there is a difference. I could read his prose on salary, but not Jane's. Jane is entirely impossible. It seems a great pity that they allowed her to die a natural death.
- Letter to W. D. Howells, 18 January 1909

I haven't any right to criticise books, and I don't do it except when I hate them. I often want to criticise Jane Austen, but her books madden me so that I can't conceal my frenzy from the reader; and therefore I have to stop every time I begin. Everytime I read 'Pride and Prejudice' I want to dig her up and beat her over the skull with her own shin-bone.
- Letter to Joseph Twichell, 13 September 1898

--G
(EDIT: spelling, and add 3rd quote)
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#12  Postby Spinozasgalt » Apr 04, 2010 3:07 am

I've read most of Austen's books and although Mansfield Park is my personal favourite (much to the surprise of some) Pride & Prejudice has the best merits of them all. I liked the heroine of Persuasion, the comedy of Emma, the youthfulness of Northanger Abbey and quiet charms of Sense & Sensibility, but Pride & Prejudice has all those things at once and Austen's dialogue takes on a dramatist's sensibilities.

If you're not a fan of Austen, you might like the Bronte's. I highly recommend Wuthering Heights.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#13  Postby starr » Apr 04, 2010 4:12 am

I love Pride and Prejudice. It is one of my most favourite books.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#14  Postby Delphin » Apr 04, 2010 8:32 am

It has Mr. Darcy in it. :bowdown:

But I guess, Aurlito won't be interested in him. Image
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#15  Postby Animavore » Apr 04, 2010 8:35 am

Wow. Women love it, men hate it. Quell surprise.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#16  Postby Shrunk » Apr 04, 2010 3:51 pm

Animavore wrote:Wow. Women love it, men hate it. Quell surprise.


I love it.

The weird thing is that, for years, we've been trying to get our younger daughter (now twelve) to read novels. She has just had a hard time getting into any non-fictional books. Yet Pride and Prejudice turned out to be the book that turned her around. I have no explanation for it (Maybe she just said it to shut us up.)
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#17  Postby Ash » Apr 04, 2010 3:58 pm

I love it - even though I wouldn't usually go for that type of book. It's one of the few books I can read over and over without getting bored with the story.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#18  Postby Aurlito » Apr 04, 2010 4:03 pm

I can't read it man. it's hard. hard dammit. :whine: hard. I lose the track of the sentences, the conversations are boring, I forget the last paragraph by the next one. but I have to suck it up. I've been through harder. my dad's funereal for example. keep it up man keep it up. :picard:
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#19  Postby cherries » Apr 04, 2010 4:09 pm

:coffee:
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This is because most books on witchcraft were written by men."
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#20  Postby Shrunk » Apr 04, 2010 5:11 pm

Aurlito wrote:I can't read it man. it's hard. hard dammit. :whine: hard. I lose the track of the sentences, the conversations are boring, I forget the last paragraph by the next one. but I have to suck it up. I've been through harder. my dad's funereal for example. keep it up man keep it up. :picard:


See, that's what I love about Austen. You don't read her for the plot, or the characters, but for the words themselves, arranged into long, sensuous sentences that loop around and double back on themselves in surprising ways, all the time perfectly obeying all rules of syntax. Sentences like this one, from Emma:

Mrs. Goddard was the mistress of a School--not of a seminary, or an establishment, or any thing which professed, in long sentences of refined nonsense, to combine liberal acquirements with elegant morality, upon new principles and new systems--and where young ladies for enormous pay might be screwed out of health and into vanity--but a real, honest, old-fashioned Boarding-school, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be sent to be out of the way, and scramble themselves into a little education, without any danger of coming back prodigies.


I'd say, if you're having so much trouble with the language of the book itself, then give it up (if you can, and aren't reading this as a school assignment) since you're missing out on the main reason to read it. It'd be like trying to convince yourself to enjoy an omelette, when you simply cannot stand eggs.
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