RIP Russell Hoban

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RIP Russell Hoban

#1  Postby orpheus » Dec 14, 2011 6:22 pm

“A way a lone a last a loved a long the”

—James Joyce
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Re: RIP Russell Hoban

#2  Postby SafeAsMilk » Dec 14, 2011 6:42 pm

:waah: :waah: :waah:

I knew this day would come. Beautiful, melancholy, abstract. Was busy reading him in high school while everyone else was banging on about Kurt Vonnegut :mrgreen:

RIP!
"They call it the American dream, because you have to be asleep to believe it." -- George Carlin
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Re: RIP Russell Hoban

#3  Postby orpheus » Dec 14, 2011 6:50 pm

Yeah. I'm having a hard time with this - very upset.

I had a little contact with him - some emails and a few phone conversations. I wouldn't presume to say we were close friends, but what contact we did have continues to mean a lot to me. As do his books, of course. I first read Kleinzeit and it opened up a world for me - one that I always knew in the back of my mind was there, but of which i could only glimpse fleeting shadows. Then The Medusa Frequency and there was no turning back.

I often feel his world is realer than the real one.
“A way a lone a last a loved a long the”

—James Joyce
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Re: RIP Russell Hoban

#4  Postby SafeAsMilk » Dec 14, 2011 6:59 pm

orpheus wrote:Yeah. I'm having a hard time with this - very upset.

I had a little contact with him - some emails and a few phone conversations. I wouldn't presume to say we were close friends, but what contact we did have continues to mean a lot to me. As do his books, of course. I first read Kleinzeit and it opened up a world for me - one that I always knew in the back of my mind was there, but of which i could only glimpse fleeting shadows. Then The Medusa Frequency and there was no turning back.

That's awesome that you wrote with him, I wish I'd had the gumption to do the same. My friend started me on Riddley Walker, then Pilgermann (personal favorite), then Medusa Frequency. For sure, no turning back.

I really should go back and re-read Kleinzeit. I have that omnibus that they put out in 2000 or so, it might be in there. Great collection, I wooed my wife by reading her "The Marzipan Pig" :lol:

I often feel his world is realer than the real one.

Modern mythology, says I :mrgreen:
"They call it the American dream, because you have to be asleep to believe it." -- George Carlin
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Re: RIP Russell Hoban

#5  Postby Macros1980 » Dec 14, 2011 7:10 pm

My girlfriend and I both read Riddley Walker earlier this year and really enjoyed it. The language was amazing. We've heard that it's the only book he wrote in that style, but I'm keen to try his other stuff.

Sad news indeed. :confused: :confused:
To presume that your one-in-64-million chance thing is a miracle is to significantly underestimate the total number of... things... that there are. -Tim Minchin
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Re: RIP Russell Hoban

#6  Postby j.mills » Dec 14, 2011 7:43 pm

:(

NNVSNU TSRUNGH!

TO MOURN IN THE PRESENCE OF A LION!

he parbly ben the las wyld awthur in lundun

:waah:


I was bewitched by The Mouse And His Child at school (and again as an adult).

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I later came across Kleinzeit in a college book sale (my first inkling that he wrote for grown-ups too), and then gobbled up the rest, even seeing Riddley Walker on stage (David Threlfall, he da man!). Once, killing time in a library, I picked up a 5-minute kids' picture book he'd written, The Dancing Tigers, and it disturbs me to this day! The Medusa Frequency was a high point that seemed to concentrate all the concerns of his earlier stuff while bridging into his 'London phase' - which wasn't his best stuff, for my money, but always worth my time. Few authors have such a distinctive voice. Very funny too!

Good Hoban info at the Head of Orpheus.
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Where one becomes many through struggle and strife,
But the Mother of Mysteries is another man's call:
Why is there something 'stead of nothing at all?

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