What'cha Readin'?

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4361  Postby Macdoc » Jan 15, 2019 4:27 pm

Try https://www.bookbub.com - good deals on books ....but you will need the internet. You sign up ( no cost ) and get daily deals tailored to your interests maybe 8-10 books each time at 99¢ to $2.99 ( rare ) for books that can regularly cost up to $25.

I grabbed this today and my library of several hundred books is shared with family

Mind of the Raven
By Bernd Heinrich

From a New York Times bestselling author and biologist comes this stunning exploration of one of the world’s most extraordinary birds — from its habitat to its fascinating behavior. “Interesting and illuminating… Excellent” (Library Journal).

$1.99 $10.99
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4362  Postby crazyfitter » Jan 18, 2019 11:15 pm

Just finished two books.
The Shortest History of Germany by James Hawes. I've been bowled over by it. So much stuff that left me thinking 'why didn't I know that?' Example: In March 60 BC the main topic of conversation in Rome was the threat of barbarian asylum-seekers who were flooding into northern Italy from wars to the north. Julius Ceasar gave them a name Germani.
The division of Europe in post WW2 would have been recognised by Charlemagne in the 800's.
East Germany ie Prussia and it's Junkers, was long despised by real 'Germans' and the eventual reunification was seen as German eastern expansion.
It's always a shock to be reminded that in 1948 when I was born Germany was in ruins. Its rapid recovery was due to the fact that only 6.5% of its industry was destroyed, while most destruction was done to civilian centres including the least Nazi areas to the west.

I'm glad I've got this as a 'real' book, it makes it far easier to refer back to.


Death Without Company by Craig Johnson. I'm enjoying Craig's stories set in Wyoming especially as I worked there for a couple of weeks. I remember thinking that it must be 'the high plains' that I was working in and it was a pleasant surprise to see it referred to as that.
'Um-hmm,yes, it is so '
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4363  Postby Macdoc » Jan 19, 2019 1:00 am

The Walt Longmire books are terrific. I'm about half way through the story arc...16 books I think. Makes me laugh and cry. The TV series is good ...the books are better. :thumbup:
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4364  Postby crazyfitter » Jan 19, 2019 10:14 pm

I've never seen the tv series, in fact left to me we wouldn't have a tv in the house. I really am a boring old fart.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4365  Postby Macdoc » Jan 20, 2019 4:46 am

You are :D ...big screen immersive TV without commercials is very enjoyable and engaging....tho the books make me chuckle more.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4366  Postby bogdan9310 » Feb 06, 2019 9:42 pm

I started reading Prometheus Rising by Robert Anton Wilson. So far it's looking promising.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4367  Postby Macdoc » Feb 07, 2019 12:17 am

Image

Next on the list and will be quite interested


AUTHOR: MEGAN MOLTENIMEGAN MOLTENI
SCIENCE
02.04.1907:00 AM
THE WORLD MIGHT ACTUALLY RUN OUT OF PEOPLE

YOU KNOW THE story. Despite technologies, regulations, and policies to make humanity less of a strain on the earth, people just won’t stop reproducing. By 2050 there will be 9 billion carbon-burning, plastic-polluting, calorie-consuming people on the planet. By 2100, that number will balloon to 11 billion, pushing society into a Soylent Green scenario. Such dire population predictions aren’t the stuff of sci-fi; those numbers come from one of the most trusted world authorities, the United Nations.

But what if they’re wrong? Not like, off by a rounding error, but like totally, completely goofed?

That’s the conclusion Canadian journalist John Ibbitson and political scientist Darrell Bricker come to in their newest book, Empty Planet, due out February 5th.

more
https://www.wired.com/story/the-world-m ... =synd_digg

:popcorn:
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4368  Postby Macdoc » Feb 08, 2019 9:00 am

Image

interesting both from a woman getting her dues for her own work and the history of the agencies that work spawned.

Joining the ranks of Hidden Figures and In the Garden of Beasts, the incredible true story of the greatest codebreaking duo that ever lived, an American woman and her husband who invented the modern science of cryptology together and used it to confront the evils of their time, solving puzzles that unmasked Nazi spies and helped win World War II
:popcorn:
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4369  Postby Macdoc » Feb 13, 2019 7:25 pm

Image

fantastic....what a debut novel.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4370  Postby Macdoc » Feb 16, 2019 6:28 pm

and the sequel not due until dec :whine:

Chilren of Time will have to do....keeping a wary eye on Image :popcorn:
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4371  Postby bogdan9310 » Feb 18, 2019 5:30 pm

My next read:
Image
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4372  Postby Macdoc » Feb 20, 2019 10:23 am

Image

lovely read - learned a lot.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4373  Postby Macdoc » Feb 22, 2019 6:55 am

Chased around a bit ...did not know there was a Hugo for best series ...of course Vorkosegan Saga deservedly won the inaugural. Bujold can write.

this was a candidate and pulled me in right quick......good concept and this one can write too :cheers: :popcorn:

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4374  Postby Macdoc » Mar 05, 2019 5:47 pm

Out on a ride to Copperlode a sort local ride up the range, was not going to stay long but then got chatting with a couple and a few enjoyable hours later I'm deep into the book he wrote.

https://www.elystandard.co.uk/news/ely-author-john-taylor-i-will-find-you-1-5317396

John M. Taylor
John Taylor was born in Ely in 1944 and raised in Littleport. He has been married to Elisabeth for 44 years and has three adult children. He has worked in 20 different countries and lived in England, Switzerland, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Australia. He now calls Cambridge home.


He and Elisabeth were lovely to chat with and quite a few shared fav places and adventures, sailplanes, Western Cape - he was a rock climber and we swapped fav vids.
Just a nice contact and the book has me hooked as it's the kind of story I like.

Image
https://www.austinmacauley.com/author/taylor-john-m
If you hate the xtians ...this is good reason.

They will be moving back to Cairns after an ill advised return to England for a couple years so back to Australia.

Unexpected treat...both book and couple.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4375  Postby crazyfitter » Mar 10, 2019 10:53 pm

Reading Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente and not really enjoying it at all. The author has obviously read the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy books, several times.

Once upon a time on a small watery, excitable planet called Earth, in a small watery country called Italy, a soft spoken, rather nice-looking gentleman by the name of Enrico Fermi was born into a family so overprotective that he felt compelled to invent the atomic bomb.

And so it goes on, and on, and on. I've read over half of it now so will complete but my mind keeps drifting to what I'll read next.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4376  Postby Macdoc » Mar 14, 2019 11:18 pm

Just a follow up on Steerswoman series. HIGHLY recommended

“Of course, the best example of hard science fiction to date is Rosemary Kirstein’s Steerswoman series (The Steerswoman, The Outskirters’ Secret, The Lost Steerman, and The Language of Power). What at first appears to be a straightforward fantasy setting, in which wise-woman Rowan finds herself pitted against a community of (generally quite disagreeable) wizards, is soon revealed to be nothing of the sort. In fact, Rowan’s world is far more alien and interesting than most secondary-world fantasies. Rather than a Tolkienian struggle between good and evil as such, the heart of the series is science itself, the process of unravelling the true nature of the world despite all the barriers placed in our way.”


https://www.tor.com/2018/12/17/five-wor ... tekeepers/

book 5 and 6 are in the works.

Hopefully not another Name of the Wind fiasco. Waiting for ages for Volume 3 ...it's due for a TV series and Book 3 not finished ...... :nono: Sound familiar?

Image
https://www.tor.com/2018/01/29/sam-raim ... -the-wind/
The series has the potential of GoT tho not the scope. More a Potter scale but terrific visual potential and needs the correct leads.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4377  Postby crazyfitter » Mar 28, 2019 9:52 pm

Macdoc wrote:Chased around a bit ...did not know there was a Hugo for best series ...of course Vorkosegan Saga deservedly won the inaugural. Bujold can write.

this was a candidate and pulled me in right quick......good concept and this one can write too :cheers: :popcorn:

Image



Thanks for this Macdoc, over halfway through and well hooked :cheers:
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4378  Postby Macdoc » Apr 07, 2019 11:47 am

Yeah can't wait for the next two ...

Ran out of Robin Hobbs then discovered she wrote under another name

Image

very unique.

CrazyFitter Hobbs world is a terrific creation but needs to be read in a certain order to make sense. There are number of trilogies that all fit together tho it's not obvious early on. The Fool is one of the great fantasy creations of all time.
I think Assassins Apprentice starts it all.
This is good coverage
https://www.barnesandnoble.com/blog/sci ... obin-hobb/

The other highly recommended series is the Vorkosigan Saga by Bujold which won the first Hugo series award. ( I think Hobbs should have ).
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4379  Postby crazyfitter » Apr 08, 2019 8:50 pm

Have just read The Outskirters Secret and The Lost Steersman and about to start The Language of Power. Then I’ve a couple of books I want to read before I start on anything else. The Barns and Noble review looks good so will probably head in that direction. Thanks.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4380  Postby Mike_L » Apr 30, 2019 1:20 pm

Revisited...

clarkesworld.jpg
clarkesworld.jpg (10.67 KiB) Viewed 49 times

...for the first time in a few years.
The site, named for Arthur C. Clarke, is apparently still going strong and still offering free sci-fi short stories for online reading.

I enjoyed this one...

Gaze of Robot, Gaze of Bird

— by ERIC SCHWITZGEBEL

About the author

Eric Schwitzgebel is a professor of philosophy at University of California, Riverside, and a cooperating member of UCR's program in Speculative Fiction and Cultures of Science. His short fiction has appeared in Clarkesworld, F&SF, Nature, Weird Tales, Apex, Unlikely Story, The Dark, and elsewhere. His third non-fiction book, A Theory of Jerks and Other Philosophical Misadventures is forthcoming with MIT Press later this year. At his blog, The Splintered Mind, he posts regularly on issues at the intersection of philosophy, psychology, and speculative fiction.


First, an eye. The camera rose, swiveling on its joint, compiling initial scans of the planetary surface. Second, six wheels on struts, pop-pop, pop-pop, pop-pop, and a platform unfolding between the main body and the eye. Third, an atmospheric taster and wind gauge. Fourth, a robotic arm. The arm emerged holding a fluffy, resilient, nanocarbon monkey doll, which it carefully set on the platform.

The monkey doll had no actuators, no servos, no sensors, no cognitive processors. Monkey was, however, quite huggable. Monkey lay on his back on the warm platform, his black bead eyes pointed up toward the stars. He had traveled wadded near J11-L’s core for ninety-five thousand years. His arms, legs, and tail lay open and relaxed for the first time since his hurried manufacture.

J11-L sprouted more eyes, more arms, more gauges—also stabilizers, ears, a scoop, solar panels, soil sensors, magnetic whirligigs. Always, J11-L observed Monkey more closely than anything else, leaning its eyes and gauges in.

J11-L arranged Monkey’s limbs on the platform, gently flexing and massaging the doll. J11-L scooped up a smooth stone from near its left front wheel, brushed it clean, then wedged it under Monkey’s head to serve as a pillow. J11-L stroked and smoothed Monkey’s fur, which was rumpled from the long journey.

“I love you, Monkey,” emitted J11-L, in a sound resembling language. “Will you stay with me while I build a Home?”

Monkey did not reply.
...

Continued at:
http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/schwitzgebel_04_19/
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