Are we lighter in the daytime?

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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#121  Postby campermon » Jan 02, 2015 4:33 pm

twistor59 wrote:
campermon wrote:The tide comes in...the tide goes out...

:popcorn:


The tide is high but I'm holding on....


I gonna be your number one...

:grin:
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#122  Postby Thommo » Jan 02, 2015 4:36 pm

DavidMcC wrote:It must be, in spite of various authors and media claiming that the lunar bulge is one-sided.


What authors? The only person who I've seen claim this was you, in the case of a planet that was not rotating. You were of course wrong.

DavidMcC wrote:It would only be one-sided if the earth was not spinning on its axis, and did not have angular momentum to conserve.


This is incorrect, as explained very well in numerous places, in particular in the links kindly supplied by Pulsar and Veida.

DavidMcC wrote:As it is, the lunar pull tips up the plane of the bulge.
The earth's oceans are like a large gyroscope, tipping when interfered with.


Completely irrelevant. You can consider the compound effect from the centrifugal force (as experienced in a rotating frame) and the tidal force, this does not mean that the forces themselves are interdependent, or prevent discussing and understanding each effect in turn before combining them. You've got to learn to walk before you learn to run.
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#123  Postby Thommo » Jan 02, 2015 4:37 pm

Macdoc wrote:

The tidal effect due to the sun is not the equatorial bulge and I don't think it's a standing wave either


where did I say it was equatorial?


Where did I say you said it was equatorial?
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#124  Postby Pulsar » Jan 02, 2015 4:43 pm

campermon wrote:
twistor59 wrote:
campermon wrote:The tide comes in...the tide goes out...

:popcorn:


The tide is high but I'm holding on....


I gonna be your number one...

:grin:

I'm not the kind of guy who gives up just like that
Oh, no

:whistle:
"The longer I live the more I see that I am never wrong about anything, and that all the pains that I have so humbly taken to verify my notions have only wasted my time." - George Bernard Shaw
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#125  Postby Thommo » Jan 02, 2015 4:45 pm

Pulsar wrote:I'm not the kind of guy who gives up just like that
Oh, no

:whistle:


Objection!
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#126  Postby kennyc » Jan 02, 2015 4:47 pm

Tidal Forces Sustained!
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#127  Postby twistor59 » Jan 02, 2015 4:54 pm

Know what, I reckon I can hear the sound of a distant tide willowing across the sand.....
A soul in tension that's learning to fly
Condition grounded but determined to try
Can't keep my eyes from the circling skies
Tongue-tied and twisted just an earthbound misfit, I
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#128  Postby campermon » Jan 02, 2015 4:57 pm

twistor59 wrote:Know what, I reckon I can hear the sound of a distant tide willowing across the sand.....


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I bet everything is green and submarine....

:cheers:
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#129  Postby twistor59 » Jan 02, 2015 4:58 pm

campermon wrote:
twistor59 wrote:Know what, I reckon I can hear the sound of a distant tide willowing across the sand.....


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I bet everything is green and submarine....

:cheers:



Indeed, I was just wondering whether the sun or moon would have most effect on an albatross hanging motionless upon the air, say.....overhead....?
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#130  Postby DavidMcC » Jan 02, 2015 5:00 pm

Thommo wrote:
DavidMcC wrote:It must be, in spite of various authors and media claiming that the lunar bulge is one-sided.


What authors? The only person who I've seen claim this was you, in the case of a planet that was not rotating. You were of course wrong.

DavidMcC wrote:It would only be one-sided if the earth was not spinning on its axis, and did not have angular momentum to conserve.


This is incorrect, as explained very well in numerous places, in particular in the links kindly supplied by Pulsar and Veida.

DavidMcC wrote:As it is, the lunar pull tips up the plane of the bulge.
The earth's oceans are like a large gyroscope, tipping when interfered with.


Completely irrelevant. You can consider the compound effect from the centrifugal force (as experienced in a rotating frame) and the tidal force, this does not mean that the forces themselves are interdependent, ...

You may be misunderstanding - the EFFECTS of different forces are inter-dependent, even though their oriogins are unrelated. That is to say that the moon tips up the plane of the equatorial bulge, which relates them, in my books. If there was no moon, the daily tides would be very weak, in spite of the rotational bulge, because we would stay at the same position w'/r to the bulge until the season changed.
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#131  Postby twistor59 » Jan 02, 2015 5:01 pm

Off topic :this:
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#132  Postby DavidMcC » Jan 02, 2015 5:03 pm

twistor59 wrote:Off topic :this:

:rofl:
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#133  Postby Veida » Jan 02, 2015 5:03 pm

DavidMcC wrote:
"The sun isn't uniform"?? :lol:

You didn't get it, as Thommo pointed out above.

DavidMcC wrote:An important thing I missed out in this recent "debate" is that there is an equatorial bulge in the oceans, caused by the earth's rotation about its own axis,

Yes, that is true, but it doesn't change over time. So that is not relevant.

DavidMcC wrote:and that this bulge is tilted up by the moon's gravitional pull. That tilt is the reason why any one point on the earth's surface passes through two maxima and minima every 24 hours. I explained this a long time ago, in an old thread, but you might have missed it.

This is simply not correct. The rotation causes the shape of the Earth to be a spheroid rather than a sphere, but that has nothing to do with the tides.
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#134  Postby campermon » Jan 02, 2015 5:05 pm

twistor59 wrote:Off topic :this:


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

:cheers:
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#135  Postby Thommo » Jan 02, 2015 5:07 pm

Image
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#136  Postby DavidMcC » Jan 02, 2015 5:10 pm

Veida wrote:
DavidMcC wrote:
"The sun isn't uniform"?? :lol:

You didn't get it, as Thommo pointed out above.

DavidMcC wrote:An important thing I missed out in this recent "debate" is that there is an equatorial bulge in the oceans, caused by the earth's rotation about its own axis,

Yes, that is true, but it doesn't change over time. So that is not relevant.

Nonsense. It is regukarly tilted up and down by the moon's pull. It seems like yoju have to study gyroscopes more.
DavidMcC wrote:and that this bulge is tilted up by the moon's gravitional pull. That tilt is the reason why any one point on the earth's surface passes through two maxima and minima every 24 hours. I explained this a long time ago, in an old thread, but you might have missed it.

This is simply not correct. The rotation causes the shape of the Earth to be a spheroid rather than a sphere, but that has nothing to do with the tides.

I was talking about the earth's oceans. They spin with the earth, but the plane of their spin can be tipped by the moon. It's a gyroscopic effect.
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#137  Postby Thommo » Jan 02, 2015 5:11 pm

This is physically hurting me now. :(
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#138  Postby DavidMcC » Jan 02, 2015 5:11 pm

Thommo wrote:Image

My point, exactly, but you have forgotten the implications for contact force (your weight). Thus, your account is inadequate.
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#139  Postby Fallible » Jan 02, 2015 5:13 pm

:teef:
John Grant wrote:They say 'let go, let go, let go, you must learn to let go'.
If I hear that fucking phrase again, this baby's gonna blow
Into a million itsy bitsy tiny pieces, don't you know,
Just like my favourite scene in Scanners .
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Re: Are we lighter in the daytime?

#140  Postby DavidMcC » Jan 02, 2015 5:16 pm

Fallible wrote::teef:

Thankyou, Fallible, for your cogent remark! :lol:
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