Molecular Fusion

The mechanics of converting atmospheric gases

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Molecular Fusion

#1  Postby jlindgaard » Jun 22, 2015 12:26 pm

Hi All,
New here, sister forum didn't let me know there was a skeptic forum as well.
One thing I have been pursuing is a mechanical way to reduce CO2 emissions. Myself, I think Mechanical Engineering
will offer an economical solution and since I have 2 different ideas, shouldn't be a surprise my thinking this.
The link is to a video about static electricity and water. If you consider the Van Allan Belt and our atmosphere, paralleled
behaviors. And since water has a positive polarity, I think the static electricity is creating a negatively charged field. Otherwise, a positive polarity shouldn't be attracted to a positive charge.
Why does this matter, at present it is only my opinion that when gases are expanded (water doesn't expand but can become more excited) that collisions happen. And while in chemistry, valence and ionic bonds are the focus, with water and CO2 I think charge or polarization has more to do with it.
An example would be that O2 has a positive charge, water has a positive polarity and carbon is essentially a ground. And when CO2 is expanded then it becomes a negative potential which could attract a water molecule. And while most people would say boric acid, if water and oxygen both have a positive potential, then in a collision, they would repel each other.
What could be an interesting aspect is if a CO2 molecule transfers angular momentum (spin) the H2O molecule. Then because the water molecule is smaller, a sufficient spin might make it more attractive to a carbon element than an O2 molecule having less kinetic energy.
At the same time, if a water molecule is sufficiently excited, then it could bond with the carbon element. One thing to be mindful of is that 90% of all CH2O is found in the upper troposphere. And around the equator, it's ceiling height can be as high as 15 miles/24 km's while at the poles, 5 miles/8 km's. And during the night, that might be the 10 miles/16 km's mentioned.
And with a mechanical system, vacuum could be used to remove CO2 in the necessary amounts from the emissions of power plants. And if a mechanical method can be shown to convert CO2 and H2O, then another gas that is emitted by power plants might be able to be used to generate 2 safer molecules. There are fresh water shortages so using water would only be valid for studying this type of behavior if it is found to be possible.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhWQ-r1LYXY
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Re: Molecular Fusion

#2  Postby jlindgaard » Jun 23, 2015 1:05 pm

@All,
I have been hoping to have a simple experiment tried where normal atmospheric gases are expanded in a hydraulic cylinder.
Some water would be supplied to encourage fusion. The reason for a hydraulic cylinder is positive displacement. And since most are rated at over 2,000 psi, they should have a sufficient seal to generate sufficient vacuum.
If the area of our tropopause is considered, at night it lowers in altitude. And then as night turns to day, it's elevation increases. This demonstrates that work is being performed. With CH2O, 90% of that molecule is found in the upper troposphere.
And when the tropopause rises higher, the upper troposphere has to "pull" more atmospheric gases into the increased volume of space that it has to occupy. And it might be during this period of work that most CH2O molecules occur.
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